NJ Harvest Dates: What’s Available at Farmers Markets and When

Photo of Riverview Park Farmers Market: Mickey Mathis © Harmony Media, NJ

Wondering what fresh fruits and vegetables will likely be available at the farmers markets and when? The state Department of Agriculture has put together a handy Harvest Dates Availability Chart, which includes the early and late target harvest dates of a variety of fruits and vegetables, as well as their peak harvest dates, which is what is listed below.

FRUITS & BERRIES
Apples: September 1 – October 25
Blackberries: July 15 – July 30
Blueberries: July 5 – August 10
Cherries: June 10 – June 25
Cranberries: October 1 – November 1
Grapes: September 10 – September 20
Peaches, Nectarines: July 20 – September 1
Pears: August 10 – August 31
Plums: July 15 – August 15
Red Raspberries (Traditional): July 5 – July 21
Red Raspberries (Fall Bearing): September 1 – September 20
Strawberries: June 1 – June 10

VEGETABLES
Asparagus: May 1 – May 30
Beets: July 1 – October 31
Broccoli: July 1 – October 31
Cabbage: June 10 – October 31
Cauliflower: October 5 – November 20
Collards: August 20 – October 31
Cucumbers: July 5 – August 15
Eggplant: July 20 – September 30
Lettuce (Late Spring): May 20 – July 15
Lettuce (Early Fall): September 15 – November 15
Lima Beans: July 15 – August 31
Okra: August 15 – September 15
Onions: June 25 – July 31
Peas: June 15 – June 25
Peppers: July 15 – Oct. 31
Potatoes: July 20 – September 30
Pumpkins: October 1 – October 15
Snap Beans: June 20 – July 20
Squash: June 25 – September 1
Spinach: May 5 – June 25
Sweet Corn: July 5 – August 31
Tomatoes: July 10 – September 15

OTHER
Flowers, everlastings and herbs: July 15 – September 15

Need ideas on what to do with your farm-fresh goods, once you’ve brought them home? The state’s “Jersey Fresh” website also has recipe suggestions. Here is one of the many delicious ideas you can try.

Photo: Catherine Hecht © Harmony Media, NJ

JERSEY SUMMER FRUIT CRISP

10 cups cut-up Jersey Fresh peaches, strawberries, plums, blueberries (any combination)
½ cup granulated sugar, or to taste
¼ cup Laird’s Apple Jack* (an apple brandy produced in Colts Neck, NJ or use an apple brandy of your choice) – For a non-alcoholic option substitute equal amounts of apple juice or apple cider.
1 tsp fresh lemon juice
3 TBSP plus ¼ cup flour (divided use)
1 cup rolled oats
1 cup chopped walnuts* (divided into ½ cups) – Avoiding nuts or have allergies? Substitute pumpkin seeds (pepitas) or sunflower seeds.
1 TBSP brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon 1/3 cup butter, softened

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Spray a 9-inch by 13-inch pan with non-stick spray.

Gently toss fruit with sugar, Apple Jack, and lemon juice. Sprinkle with 3 TBS flour. (If fruit is very juicy, drain some or add a bit more flour.) Toss gently. Spread fruit in prepared pan; set aside.

Topping: In food processor or blender, process ½ cup walnuts until fine; transfer to a bowl; add oats, brown sugar, cinnamon, and remaining flour. Using a pastry blender, cut butter into oat mixture until crumbly. Add remaining chopped walnuts. Sprinkle mixture evenly over fruit.

Bake 20 to 25 minutes, until fruit is tender and topping is golden brown. Serve warm, with whipped cream, if desired. Serves 12.

For more recipes and information on eating “Jersey Fresh,” visit jerseyfresh.nj.gov.

Jersey Summer Fruit Crisp Recipe via the State of New Jersey, Department of Agriculture website. All other text and images © Harmony Media, NJ. All rights reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced without written permission.

Catherine Hecht

is the owner of Harmony Media, NJ, the publisher of Jersey City Independent and blogs about urban gardening at dig a path. She's lived in Jersey City since 1999 and resides in the Heights section with her wife Beth Achenbach, they were the first couple to file as legal domestic partners in Jersey City. Cat has over 10 years experience in communications, marketing and publishing, she's studied anthropology, art history, woman & gender studies, botany, ethnobotany, and herbology and she is a graduate of the Rising Tide Capital Community Business Academy. She is also is a community activist, registered voter, gay rights activist, art lover, gardener, environmentalist, and an animal advocate.